Spline continues …

Hi all,

I have now completed full spline past the teardrop on the main peninsula.  Since the last post, I installed the temporary joists to support the spline up to and around the teardrop.

spline on peninsula

spline at teardrop

spline at teardropAs described previously, the first job is to set out the two centre strips, held in place by nails and temporarily clamped together.  Then, using a plywood template set to 40 inch radius, the centre strips are then adjusted to the correct radius.  Once the final position of the spline looks OK, the centre strips are glued and clamped together.  Then the normal process of attaching the spacer blocks and the other spline strips continues.

completed spline looking back towards Kankool

completed spline looking towards teardrop

teardrop spline

spline at teardrop

Just to finish off, following a request from a fellow modeller, here is a shot of the track plan showing spline progress to date.    The red line shows where I am currently up to, and shows a distance of 92 feet of spline completed.

Cheers.

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Posted on December 13, 2011, in Benchwork and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. Thanks Ian, I will investigate both. I must admit I like collecting tools, my Dad has the same ‘problem’.

    Ray

  2. Ian

    It’s looking very nice, I love those sweeping curves.

    I am intrigued by the vertical drill and the mill on the side bench, what is the brand and model numbers?

    I have an old Unimat lathe/mill from when I first went to work and a large one under the layout with a 22″ table, one too small and one too large. When I get to retire I would like to scratchbuild a loco or two and I might look at a new set up.

    Ray P

    • Hi Ray,

      Yes the spline certainly creates nice flowing curves.

      The machines are PROXXON. I’ve had them for a number of years now. The drill is the TBM-220 and the mill is the MF-70. Both were purchased from http://www.woodworking.com.au/. The drill is great as there is no ‘slop’ in the spindle which is great for the small drill bits.

      Cheers.

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