Blog Archives

More track laid & scenery continues at Kankool …

Hi all,

Since the last post, I have continued with the laying of rail from Kankool towards the bridge at Chilcott’s Creek and also for a couple of metres towards Ardglen.

This had come to a bit of a standstill due to me running out of the 3D printed fishplates a couple of months ago, but I have since come up with a new plan to allow tracklaying to progress independent of my stocks of fishplates.

I have started to paint the non-viewable side of each rail with the Krylon camo brown prior to fixing to the CV ties.  There is no need to have fishplates on the non-visible side of the rail.  That being said, I did fix them to both sides of the rail on the main and loop roads at Kankool, but only realised it was a waste after the fact!  Once the half-painted rail is fixed down, I will then go along and glue the fishplates to the viewable side of the rail and then spray the whole track, including the CV ties, with the Krylon.  I think this will aid in colouring and weathering the CV ties later on.

Over the last few months, in between other jobs, I started to glue down copious amounts of the XPS yellow foam in readiness to begin shaping the landform in the section from Chilcott’s Creek and through Kankool.

Cheers.

Kankool trackwork – Part IV …

Hi all,

Apologies for the long time between posts.

Since the last post, I have completed the trackwork at Kankool, which included completing laying of the CV tie bases, fixing down the two turnout assemblies and gluing rail to the CV ties.

layout_construction_325

The above pictures show both the Willow Tree end and Murrurundi end turnout assemblies now fixed in place.  Prior to fixing down, they were carefully washed in soapy water to remove any solder and flux residues, then painted with the Krylon flat brown paint.  I’m hoping it will provide the same flat base to allow for weathering later on.

Once the turnouts were in place, I could start laying the rail on the plain track sections.  The process is the same as was used when I laid the first section of CV ties and rail in the Temple Court section.  Refer to this post as a reminder.  The only difference now is that I am painting the rail with the Krylon prior to fixing in place.

Another extra task that is being done prior to painting the rail, is to add cosmetic fishplates.  I did not do this in the Temple Court section, but they will be added to the rail later and touched up with paint.

I am using 3D printed 6-bolt fishplates from Ray Pilgrim.  There are superglued every 40 scale feet along the rails.

They are a bit hard to see in the picture above, but I am hoping once the rail is weathered, they will stand out more.

To finish this post, below are a couple of shots of the finished trackwork looking from each turnout.

Cheers.

A couple of dirty 45’s …

Hi all,

Recently, I decided to have a go at weathering a couple of my Auscision Models 45 class locomotives.

This all came about some time ago after I had opened up one of the models to determine what was going to be required to change the wheelsets to RP25/88.

A problem I found was that the half axles are shouldered, and would not have been easy to replace the wheelsets without drilling out bearings.  After a number of weeks just sitting on the workbench, and pondering the NMRA Fine:HO standards, I decided to leave the factory fitted RP25/110 wheelsets in place, as these will operate on the new standards.  Also, locomotive wheels are virtually hidden behind their sideframes, so the tyre tread width is not very noticeable.

So, having decided to keep the 110 wheels, and before putting the loco back together, I thought it was an ideal time to do some weathering.

The 45 class model comes apart relatively easily.  The couplers are removed, then the four screw retaining the one piece body which reveals the chassis and motor.

The sideframes are amazing pieces of engineering, resulting in a highly detailed copy of the prototype.  They also are very easily removed from the bogies.

The bogie keeper plate also unclips easily exposing the drivetrain.  The wheelsets were re-gauged to the new back-to-back measurement using a new gauge obtained from DCC Concepts.

The weathering process involves using artists’ acrylic crayons ground into a fine powder then sealed with isopropyl alcohol after each application.  The crayons are the Conte brand and were sourced from Art Scene.  The technique was shown to me by good friend and fellow weathering artist Aaron Denning.

The photo below shows a locomotive separated into its main components, ready to start the weathering process.

45 Class locomotive separated into sub-assemblies prior to weathering

 

The chassis is then masked off to protect the electricals and motor.  The chassis and bogie sideframes are then painted with Krylon camouflage flat black and the body is sprayed with a matt clear coat.  I have used Tamiya flat clear.

sub-assemblies painted with flat black

 

The sideframes and chassis are then treated with various colours of the powdered crayons, working from photographs to get the desired result.

chassis and sideframes re-assembled

 

Again working from photographs, the body is treated in a similar manner.  An all over dusting is done to tone down the factory colour, then black is applied to the roof.  In the pictures below, 4507 has retained the crew and had the windows opened, as it will be a lead unit.  4531 has had the crew removed and windows left closed as it will be a trailing unit in a consist.  To do this, the cab needs to be removed and with a bit of delicate poking, pulling and pushing, slides right off the body.  This was actually done prior to hitting with the matt finish so the cab interior gets done.

 

The following shots show the two completed models.

 

The last picture shows the inspiration for 4531.

 

That’s two out of eight done!

 

Cheers.

Chilcotts’s Ck bridge assembly – Part II …

Hi all,

Work has progressed on the bridge over the last couple of days.

The bridge spans sub-assembly was washed and then some girder support pads were fixed in place at each of the girder section joins.  These polyurethane castings are made from my own patterns.

support pads attached

support pads

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The bridge was then sprayed with Krylon camoflague matt brown paint.  This is a super flat finish paint that a mate introduced me to and is used as a base coat to accept weathering powders.  More details on these later.

The spray went on very nicely and didn’t hide the rivet detail at all.

painted bridge spans

 

The photo below is the look I am trying to achieve with the weathering to come.

prototype bridge

 

Cheers.

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