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Chilcott’s Creek bridge assembly – Part VI …

Hi all,

A brief update on some more progress on the Chilcott’s Creek bridge scene.

The bridge abutments are now fixed in position, and most of the foam is also fixed down.

 

I also did some more weathering to the bridge piers.  Following on from the previous Part V post, the rust streaking was done using oil paints and turps to drag the colours down the piers.

layout_construction_307

I’m quite happy with the results with some more work to be done.

Cheers.

Chilcott’s Creek bridge assembly – Part V …

Hi all,

I have recently been redoing the weathering on the Chilcott’s Ck bridge abutments and piers. I wasn’t happy with my first attempt using the acrylic crayon powders quite a while ago.  So, this time using oil paints, I applied an all over light grey colour using a stippling brush and I think it has produced a neat effect.  Then using other colours like black, white and more grey, I have again stippled over the top for a random effect.  For the rust staining, I used the oils again but washed them down with turps.  Again pretty happy with the results so far.

abutment weathering take 2

abutment weathering take 2

 

I have also finished the “base” grey coat on the piers and will let that dry before moving onto the rust staining.

pier weathering take 2

 

I have also made some more progress on the Chilcott’s Ck bridge scene over the last few days.  A slight change of plans to what I mentioned previously, in that I have decided to fix the timber sub-module base in place then add the scenery foam around and on top of it.  The abutments will then be fixed in place, along with the piers.  Scenery including dirts and grasses will then be applied, and hopefully some ‘water’ in the creek!  The bridge span will then be fixed in place once all this has been completed.  Pictures show all the foam pieces and the sub-module base temporarily in place.

A plywood base was fixed in place to provide support for the foam.

plywood base and sub-module in place

 

With the bridge sub-module sitting in place, a jigsaw of various pieces of foam were cut to fit.  First off were two pieces front and back to continue the creek bed, which was drawn in and then routed out to the same depth as on the timber sub-module.

creek bed foam in place

 

Then other pieces of foam were cut and shaped to fit the previously made pieces under the bridge.

 

The last two pictures show the bridge span and piers temporarily in place to give an idea of how the scene will look.  Final shaping of the foam will be done when the pieces are fixed down.

Cheers.

Chilcott’s Creek bridge assembly – Part IV …

Hi all,

Recently I have continued work on the Chilcott’s Creek bridge scene.

Back in December 2014, I made a post where I had started to weather the bridge piers and abutments.

I was never really happy with how the colour on the abutments had turned out, so I decided to redo them.

Using some new oil based paints and some new techniques, I mixed up a new lighter colour of grey and applied to the abutments.  I am happy so far with the result.  The paint was stippled on and has given a rougher surface appearance.  I’ll redo the rust stains as well.  I think I will also redo the piers.

I also added the small extensions to the wingwalls.

re-done abutment weathering

re-done abutment weathering

 

The plan was always to build the bridge on a sub-assembly and then slot it into place.  As the base of the sub-module needed to be near to perfectly flat, I decided to laminate a piece of 3-ply to another piece of hardwood.  I roughly marked out the future riverbed and removed the first layer of ply using a router.  My idea is to eventually try my hand at some model water.

Chilcott's Creek riverbed

Chilcott's Creek riverbed

 

I have also started on forming the scenery around the bridge.  The idea is to form up the base scenery foam, add the dirts, grasses etc then assemble the bridge, fix the sub-assembly into the layout, levelling up as I go.  Anyway, we’ll soon see if that plan works!!

Scenery forming around bridge

Scenery forming around bridge

Scenery forming around bridge

The last photo shows the bridge & piers temporarily in place.  You get the idea!!

 

Some months ago I started laying tieplates on the bridge and have fixed one rail in place.  I had been thinking of ways to do it easily, including making a jig, but Andrew suggested I just line them up against a straight edge.

The frets of the tieplates were masked off where the base of the rail sits, painted with some Krylon flat brown paint, then dusted a ‘rusty’ colour with some powders.

The underside of the tieplates were then coated with Pliobond glue.

sleeper plate masking

sleeper plates painted

 

The individual tieplates were then cut out and located on the transoms, one at the end and the other about 40 transoms away.  Using a soldering iron, the tieplates are bonded to the transoms. The heat activates the Pliobond.  This then gave me two points to line the straight edge against.  The straight edge was clamped to the bridge.  More tieplates were then bonded to the transoms.  The process was repeated along the bridge.

laying out the sleeper plates

bonding the sleeper plates to the transoms

 

The next step was to fix one length of rail to this first run of tieplates.  This was done by applying the Pliobond to the underside of the rail as well as the tops of the tieplates, then locating the rail in position and carefully applying heat to the top of the rail using an old clothes iron and gradually moving along the length of the bridge.  The bond appears to be OK so far.

The plan is to then, using gauges, locate more tieplates underneath the second rail and repeat the above process.

Enjoy!

A couple of dirty 45’s …

Hi all,

Recently, I decided to have a go at weathering a couple of my Auscision Models 45 class locomotives.

This all came about some time ago after I had opened up one of the models to determine what was going to be required to change the wheelsets to RP25/88.

A problem I found was that the half axles are shouldered, and would not have been easy to replace the wheelsets without drilling out bearings.  After a number of weeks just sitting on the workbench, and pondering the NMRA Fine:HO standards, I decided to leave the factory fitted RP25/110 wheelsets in place, as these will operate on the new standards.  Also, locomotive wheels are virtually hidden behind their sideframes, so the tyre tread width is not very noticeable.

So, having decided to keep the 110 wheels, and before putting the loco back together, I thought it was an ideal time to do some weathering.

The 45 class model comes apart relatively easily.  The couplers are removed, then the four screw retaining the one piece body which reveals the chassis and motor.

The sideframes are amazing pieces of engineering, resulting in a highly detailed copy of the prototype.  They also are very easily removed from the bogies.

The bogie keeper plate also unclips easily exposing the drivetrain.  The wheelsets were re-gauged to the new back-to-back measurement using a new gauge obtained from DCC Concepts.

The weathering process involves using artists’ acrylic crayons ground into a fine powder then sealed with isopropyl alcohol after each application.  The crayons are the Conte brand and were sourced from Art Scene.  The technique was shown to me by good friend and fellow weathering artist Aaron Denning.

The photo below shows a locomotive separated into its main components, ready to start the weathering process.

45 Class locomotive separated into sub-assemblies prior to weathering

 

The chassis is then masked off to protect the electricals and motor.  The chassis and bogie sideframes are then painted with Krylon camouflage flat black and the body is sprayed with a matt clear coat.  I have used Tamiya flat clear.

sub-assemblies painted with flat black

 

The sideframes and chassis are then treated with various colours of the powdered crayons, working from photographs to get the desired result.

chassis and sideframes re-assembled

 

Again working from photographs, the body is treated in a similar manner.  An all over dusting is done to tone down the factory colour, then black is applied to the roof.  In the pictures below, 4507 has retained the crew and had the windows opened, as it will be a lead unit.  4531 has had the crew removed and windows left closed as it will be a trailing unit in a consist.  To do this, the cab needs to be removed and with a bit of delicate poking, pulling and pushing, slides right off the body.  This was actually done prior to hitting with the matt finish so the cab interior gets done.

 

The following shots show the two completed models.

 

The last picture shows the inspiration for 4531.

 

That’s two out of eight done!

 

Cheers.

Chilcott’s Ck bridge assembly – Part III …

Hi all,

Over the last couple of days, I started weathering the Chilcott’s Ck bridge girders and piers.

To refresh the memory, this is the bridge and the weathering effect I am trying to achieve.  Even though the photo was taken in the last few years, and I am modelling 30+ years ago, I don’t think the weathering would be much less.

Chilcott's Ck bridge weathering

Following on from the previous post on the subject, the completed bridge spans had been painted with Krylon camouflage brown spray paint.  The plaster piers were also painted with the Krylon.  It is a dead flat matte paint that gives a good surface for the weathering powders to adhere to.

First, a bit of background on the Krylon paint and weathering powders.

At a local model railway exhibition that was held in Sydney earlier this year, a good mate was demonstrating his latest technique for weathering rollingstock.

Rather than me repeating it verbatim, have a read of this PDF as it outlines the technique in detail.  For those readers in Australia, I obtained my Conte crayons from an online art supplier, The Art Shop.

How Aaron sprayed the Krylon over a perfectly good model comes across as a bit drastic, but you can see the results.  The Krylon is purely there to provide a “keying” surface for the crayon powders.

So, both the bridge girders and piers were painted with the Krylon.  The bridge girders then got a good coating of a blue/grey colour then a light hint of various shades of browns to simulate the dirt on the bottom half of the girders.

The plaster piers were then attacked with a light grey colour as a base to get that weathered concrete colour.  Some white was also applied to lighten the grey in certain areas.  Then it was just a matter of using various shades of browns and black to get the streaking effect.

Below is the result so far.

Still have a bit to do, but probably not far off from being finished.  I’ve also been working on the abutments using the same techniques.  Below is a photo of progress so far.

Cheers.

Off to the Epping show …

Hi all,

Well, Bowen Creek is all packed away again in the trailer ready for the trip south to Sydney for the Epping (Thornleigh) exhibition this weekend.

Over the last week or so, Andrew and I have been busy weathering some of our rollingstock.  I have done some Austrains’ WHX’s, Trainorama’s BWH’s and OnTrack Models’ louvre vans.  I won’t go into much detail on how the weathering was done in this post, but will leave that to a later time.

Here are some pics of a few of the wagons.  Use your browser’s BACK button to come back to this page.

Austrains WHX 30699

OnTrack Models GLX 29472 Trainorama BWH 29167

Trainorama FWH 28753

Trainorama FWH 28887

Any fellow bloggers who are attending the show, make sure you come up and introduce yourselves to Andrew and I.

Cheers for now.

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